Gum Guru Blog

Despite the many advances in food manufacturing, the process of dispersing powders in liquids remains a challenge. Without proper dispersion, powders like food gums form lumps which can cause production issues, including:

  • Clogging pumps and filters, resulting in production slow downs
  • Hydrating incompletely, possibly leading to quality variations between batches and increasing the need to rework out of spec product

Several techniques have been employed over the years in an effort to reduce lumping, including slurrying the gum with oil and preblending the dry ingredients before addition to the mixing tank but these production techniques have shown mixed results. However, manufacturers see nearly immediate and dramatic process improvements when they switch from powdered gums to agglomerated gums.

This episode of our Basics of Food Gums video series explores the benefits of using agglomerated gums.

Videos in the Basics of Food Gums Series

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TIC Times newsletterIn this issue:

Texturizing Non-GMO Instant Protein Beverages

Preventing Bleeding and Weeping from Fresh and Frozen Berries

4-H Campers Get Hands-On Experience with Food Science

Clean Label Steals Spotlight Again at IFT

Video: Cellulose & Pectin--Basics of Food Gums

Three Grades of Non-GMO Project Verified Xanthan Now Available

 

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Once relegated to a post-workout supplement for the most active consumers, instant protein beverages are now a staple meal replacement for consumers across all demographic categories.

How popular are sport powders like protein drinks?

According to data from Innova Market Insights, the number of new product launches in the US bearing claims of “Added Protein” or “High Source of Protein” was rather flat between 2011 and 2014. That trend was busted in 2015 when 695 new products were launched in the category, more than double the number launched the prior year.

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Bakers have the difficult task of making sure their products taste good and look good at the same time. Consumers like their food to be both beautiful and delicious so the appearance of bakery items goes a long way. In many baked goods, fresh or frozen fruit is used to add sweet, seasonal flavors to a starchy, bread-base. With the additional element of fruit comes the task of controlling the juices that leak out of colorful berries.

Anyone who works with frozen berries and fruits in dessert applications understands the delicate nature of such ingredients, whether they are mixed in a batter, set atop a pastry or blended in a fruit topping. To compensate for moisture challenges commonly associated with many types of berries and fruits, manufacturers often add stabilizers to control weeping and stabilize the finished bakery product.

preventing weeping in four plus one strawberries

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The 4-H Health and Food Science Camp welcomed 17 students to Michigan State University’s campus this August for a one-day intensive youth development program for teens. This camp aimed to help students develop interests and explore careers in the health and science industries while engaging in hands-on learning activities.

MSU alginate gel experiment

As part of the interactive undertakings of the day, TIC Gums provided a lab experiment that demonstrated how alginate reacts with calcium chloride in solution to form different textures. When the green-colored alginate solution is dispensed through a dropper into the calcium chloride solution, a bouncy, rubbery strand or droplet is created. This simple demonstration is also part of TIC Gums’ “Gums 101” course, an introduction to food hydrocolloids workshop required of all new employees.

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